62. I Think Its Gonna Be A Long Long Time

Not long after I published Post 61, John called me from Durban, where they’d diverted when Andrew developed suspected appendicitis. As well as Andrew, crew member Thomas left Unicef as he’d fallen earlier in the Leg and damaged some teeth. CV31 stayed in port long enough for the two of them to be medevac’d by the NSRI (equivalent to the UK’s RNLI), the crew to have showers and for the boat to be refuelled and re-victualled. They were back on the water within about three hours. They should get back to where they “stopped” and then their race time starts again, but I think in view of the time lost they are just racing to get to Fremantle. Depending upon the winds, I guess that will take another two to three days and that they’ll be about a week late. I’ve not changed my flights as George will be there and I have pals in Perth. We’ll all be getting as much victualling etc ready as we can for the three late boats, Unicef, Punta del Este and Visit Sanya. These latter two set off on Thursday 28th with a race start for them on Friday 29th. Here’s the path to Fremantle with all in sight (just).

Sanya and Punta far left, Unicef under “art”, Qingdao just in front

There’s possibly a bit more excitement on Friday, as Zhuhai discovered that their planned route takes them through an area where the US Navy will be doing some rocket missile practice, whatever that means. I’ve not had the chance to read today’s Skipper reports to see if Zhuhai still exists. Let’s hope they don’t use our yachts as target practice!

On a more personal note, I had another family phone call, one of John’s grand-daughters auditioned for a film and got through. I’ll tell you more about it when shooting starts. So it’s not just OBB who are stars! Talking of stars, you should remember that I took out a sleeping bag for one of the Unicef crew. She sent me a bouquet of flowers as thanks:

Thanks from Sophie

Enough about everyone else. Since I returned to London, in addition to being glued to the Clipper website with all the shenanigans going on, I’ve had a busy time. The first thing I did was reduce my resemblance to Boris Johnson’s unruly mop of hair. Then John’s brother and wife came over for the weekend so we celebrated whatever needs celebrating.

Me, Claire and Alan

On Friday night we went to About Thyme, a local restaurant which would have been even more local if we’d not walked past it first time! A couple more pals came over on Saturday and we had a late afternoon tea starting at seven, as you do. Then Monday night I went out for supper with yet more friends and had my first experience of using Uber. The day it was announced their licence has not been renewed in London. Better late than never?

Wednesday evening Rene and I went to the National Osteoporosis Society Gala Dinner with a fashion show by Julian Macdonald. Here we are enjoying the evening.

Rene and me

It was held at Banqueting House in Whitehall, so I experienced another travel first when we caught the bus there. Easy! Not so easy the next morning when we caught the bus back to Rene’s place and caught the right bus but going in the wrong direction. One stop on we got off and walked back to where we’d started.

A bit of history here, Banqueting House was where Charles I was beheaded in 1649. While he was still on the throne he commissioned Rubens to paint the ceiling which is magnificent. This is not the best picture of it you’ll ever see but you’ll get the picture (sorry!).

Rubens’ ceiling, Banqueting House

I thought that there had been a Christmas tree installed outside Tate Britain as there were a lot of bright lights. I walked down to have a gander and was rather thrown by the fact that it is an art installation of what initially looks like toilet paper. On closer inspection it is cut-out material. I have to confess I think it looks better from a distance.

Tate Britain

On Friday I went to the Royal Academy in Piccadilly with Val to see “Eco-visionaries”, to “Discover how architects, artists and designers are responding today to some of the most urgent ecological issues of our times”. It was interesting but I’m not sure I discovered much. I missed the message of what to do to help avoid future problems and took home the message that jellyfish are going to take over the world. Maybe I should go again and concentrate harder. After that Val and I went to Fortnum and Masons to have a snack. I can recommend it, you get a tiny ice-cream with your coffee!

Val and coffee

As we were sitting there we heard a commotion outside and saw a dozen or more police vehicles and ambulances trying to get down Piccadilly. It was only later that we found out there’d been another London Bridge attack with two victims dead and one critical in hospital. I can’t let the terrorists rule our lives and stop there, on such a sad note, so I’ll show you the bracelet I’ve been building.

Go back to Post 42 in August and I mentioned a Pandora bracelet I’d been given to add mementos of my journey. I’ve not found trinkets I thought special enough so I’ve been having some made by Jo who is @work just up the road from me. Here’s the work-in-progress:

Bracelet with charms

You’ll see numbers for the podium positions, a Portuguese rooster and a sun from Uruguay. I think it may get pretty crowded by the time next August comes along.

Before then, however, I’ll be in Australia for Christmas. Knowing I’d not be home, Anne very kindly bought me a tree to take with me. It’s here together with the souvenir I brought back for myself from Cape Town, a rather stylish red wine glass (so you get an idea how big the tree is!).

I snapped the message in the header at a local coffee shop and I think it could be applicable for today. If you can’t read it, here it is again. With luck and a fair wind, the next post should be more optimistic.

61. Confused? You Will Be!

Almost as soon as Post 60 went out, the decision on the Sanya / Punta collision was published on the Clipper website. Sanya has been found in clear breach of the rules “On Opposite Tacks”. You’ll have to find an expert sailor to explain it to you, but as a consequence Sanya are disqualified from Race 4 and will have zero points. They can also not gain any points from the Scoring Gate (which they obviously wouldn’t anyway as the first three yachts will be through before Sanya and Punta have even left Cape Town) nor the Ocean Sprint.

The Santa Boat? Unicef leaving Cape Town (CT)

Punta, on the other hand, has been given redress and awarded 9 points in the race, based on their performance to date in the first three races (including Scoring Gate, Ocean Sprint and final Race positions). They could also gain points from the Ocean Sprint if they are one of the three fastest times. We won’t know that for quite a while.

Clipper pennants on our spectator boat in CT

Once all repairs are finished they will race against each other to Fremantle, not against the rest of the fleet. There is an unique Clipper Race match racing trophy which will be presented to the winner of this two-boat race. This does seem odd to me, disqualify someone then say but you might win a special cup. If they require repairs to sails or equipment, the normal penalties will apply. They are expected to leave Cape Town by 29th November, based on the way the repairs are progressing. They had a practice sail on 24th November to get them all back in the swing of things. They should arrive in Fremantle just in time to join Leg 4, Race 5.

Last view of the fleet leaving CT

Back at Unicef, trundling towards Durban to drop off Andrew Toms and his suspect appendix. It had been thought they’d get there on Sunday 24th but it is today, Tuesday 26th, due to the winds not being very helpful. They can’t motor all the way as they’d not have enough fuel and they can’t medevac him until closer to shore. The poor chap only joined for this Leg so “The Race of Your Life” has gone terribly wrong for him. https://www.clipperroundtheworld.com/skipper-report/unicef/race4-day8-team48

It’s painful looking at Race Viewer this race, what with John headed in the wrong direction, in addition to the two stuck at Cape Town. By the end of this week all three of them should be headed towards Fremantle but they’re not going to have much turn-around time before Race 5. I don’t know what happens to Unicef in terms of points either. Someone said they won’t get any redress, that only happens if they have to divert for the Skipper. That seems very unfair and could in theory encourage a crew member to downplay any illness.

The Race Committee can, “at their discretion”, award points they think are appropriate. The Rules say that time spent on any diversion will normally count as time spent racing and that redress is not awarded for medical evacuations. I guess this means Unicef will have only two or three points for coming near the end: we don”t know if the nine points awarded to Punta means they are in third place or if someone else will be third (that is, two boats receive nine points). All very confusing. Punta will not be in Fremantle in time for the prizegiving so I think they cannot be considered to have third place. We’ll find out on December 14th at the prizegiving.

Donna with the compass (see Post 54)

Dare to Lead have had a freezer failure so all fresh food that they could not eat in time went overboard. Happy sharks! GoToBermuda’s generator broke down. Qingdao’s water maker (gives them fresh water) broke down. Nearly all the boats seem to be having to do major sail repairs. At least two have had problems with their wind instruments, meaning night time sailing is difficult. They are all putting safety before all-out racing. I’ve not heard anything from John, although he’s had a couple of mentions in the Skipper reports and crew diaries, so he’s still on board! George did another crew diary on 25th November which you can find here https://www.clipperroundtheworld.com/crew-diary/qingdao/637

So at the moment this race is doom and gloom, and as London is cold and grey there’s not much cheer here. Well that’s not true, I’m having a busy and fun time. I’ll tell you about it soon.

The Scoring Gate results are in. Here we have good news. Qingdao 1st across (three points so a total of 51), Ha Long Bay (HLB) second (two points, not doubled as the Joker only applies to the main race, giving a total of 31 ) and Imagine Your Korea (IYK) third (one point to bring them up to 13). It was very close between IYK and Zhuhai for the last two days but then Zhuhai hit a wind hole and slowed down. The shot below from Race Viewer shows how close they were, with the blue line being the Scoring Gate. In fact, on Nick’s Skipper report he says Qingdao radio’d and asked if they had a problem as they seemed to have come to a complete stop. https://www.clipperroundtheworld.com/skipper-report/zhuhai/race4-day9-team45

The race for third position

With the Ocean Sprint offering another three points and the Joker allowing HLB to get 22 if they win, it’s not guaranteed that Qingdao will be top of the pack in Fremantle, although they’ll have to be incredibly unlucky in the next fortnight. Stay tuned!

I think this applies to all of us!

60. Bound for South Australia

Not the most encouraging of songs, with the lyric “and as we wallop round Cape Horn (heave away, haul away) you’ll wish to God you’ve never been born”, although it does refer to going the other way around the globe via Cape Horn, not the Cape of Good Hope as OBB are doing. This was originally called the Cape of Storms due to the unpredictable weather, so maybe another sea shanty, Roll The Old Chariot Along, would be better: “we’d be alright if the wind was in our sails “.

A lot happened in Cape Town. As well as Punta being penalised six hours and ending up fourth, Imagine Your Korea (IYK) skipper Mike Surridge (see blog post 53) resigned during the stop-over. He’s been replaced for this race by Dan Smith, who was in the 2015/16 Race. At Fremantle Rob Graham will take over, who was a Skipper on the 2017/18 Race, so both have plenty of experience. https://www.clipperroundtheworld.com/news/article/imagine-your-korea-update

Then at the start of Race 4 out of Cape Town, Punta del Este (PdE) and Visit Sanya collided, badly enough to have to return to the dock for repairs. I was out in a spectator boat and got a shot of them tangled together but I can’t put it here, it’s too painful. However, out of a disaster comes some good, Punta donated all their fresh food to a local Captonian charity rather than have it go to waste. Both boats are being repaired and should be able to get to Fremantle in time to join Race 5 to Airlie Beach in The Whitsundays.

The fleet from the roof top bar of The Silo

If you are watching Race Viewer you’ll have been wondering what Unicef are up to. This morning I received a phone call from the Clipper office to tell me they were diverting back to Durban (on the South African coast) as one of the crew members, Andrew Toms, has suspected appendicitis. The poor chap only joined at Cape Town. I’ll keep you updated.

Unicef preparing for the off

Now that I have all the results I can summarise them for you. First the Scoring Gate: IYK three points, Visit Sanya two and PdE one. Next the Ocean Sprint: Seattle three points, Ha Long Bay (HLB) two and Qingdao one.

Unicef on their way

Penalty points for Leg 1 of the Race: PdE had five penalty points for a replacement Code 2 sail, I think a Yankee, or maybe a Spinnaker. I’m sure someone out there can let me know. Two others had penalty points for damage to equipment, IYK two points for damage costing over £1000, to the inner forestay, steaming light cage and pulpit repairs. Then Seattle one point for damage costing over £500 for pulpit repairs.

Unicef’s pennant

The Race 3 results were: 1st Qingdao (11 points), 2nd Unicef (10 points), 3rd HLB (9 points), 4th PdE (8 points), 5th Sanya (7 points), 6th WTC Logistics (6 points), 7th IYK (5 points), 8th Seattle (4 points), 9th GoToBermuda (GTB) (3 points), 10th Dare To Lead (DTL) (2 points) and 11th Zhuhai (1 point). Zhuhai had an injured crew member and had chosen to motor to Cape Town for the last few days for his comfort.

Qingdao’s pennants

Pulling all of this together, the current board reads Qingdao 48, Sanya 32, HLB 29, PdE 27, Unicef 23, DTL 20, Zhuhai 17, Seattle 13, IYK 12, WTC 11 and GTB 8. As there are still 12 races left plus Scoring Gates and Ocean Sprints, nothing is sure. HLB are playing their Joker for Race 4, so if they win this plus some bonus points they will be up there with Qingdao. In the 2017/18 Race the final winner was not decided until the very last race, with Sanya, Seattle and Qingdao all in the running. Who will need a full manicure by the end? Or will it be too late for our nails?

Me and Charlotte on the spectator boat

I hadn’t intended to write two blog posts so close together so you may have to wait for the next one, as long as no other news comes along. We should have the Scoring Gate result by Monday so let’s hope that nothing newsworthy happens this weekend. I’m sure there’s no news in the outside world that’s as interesting as life at this angle!

GoToBermuda heeling over

59. Pineapples are not the only fruit

We can’t leave Cape Town yet, as you’ll see from the header (not many rhinos in Australia unless they’re in a zoo). I’ll try not to give you any more pictures of Table Mountain but it may appear in the background, you can’t really get away from it.

Pineapple!

The first subject I have to address is The Beard. I see that Commo Keith has also got into the act, see his blog Pretty Much All At Sea. His wife Ruth is in full agreement with me. https://keithsclipperadventure.com/2019/11/21/here-they-go-again/

Beard unguents

I did not accompany John on his trip to (probably the same) barber but I think I should have. This is what he brought back, all for my comfort he says. As I have been tasked with carrying it around the world, I guess I’m trusted not to “accidentally” lose it anywhere. I did not notice a scrap of difference, but as The Beard had been trimmed it became like a field of close-cropped stubble once more. To make matters worse, George is now in on the act, along with his Godfather Keith.

George, Keith and John

The second subject is Kit. The crew have to remove all their kit from the boat so that it can be deep cleaned. The hotel room we stayed at in Punta del Este was quite small so I felt like I was on the boat with having to climb over stuff and the aroma surrounding it all (albeit a level surface). In Cape Town we were able to lay it outside as there was little rain and we had a good sized balcony. A dry suit is a scary object when laid out, like some Thing out of Dr Who. The only issue was it was not an easy walk, especially with all of John’s kit. On the first day going back to the boat, John managed to get lost and was 30 minutes late for his meeting. I’m trying to make sure we have large rooms closer to the marina from now on.

Empty dry suit airing

Enough complaining. This time I had an uneventful journey and spent quite a bit of time with other supporters including Anne, Fiona and Keith, featured in Post 57. Plenty of places to eat and drink on the V&A waterfront, which does not stand for Victoria and Albert but Victoria and Alfred, their second son. He was obviously influential around here.

The night that Unicef arrived there were seven of us eating in the Baia fish restaurant, overlooking the jetty. When we saw Unicef arriving we all ran out, to return about half an hour later once the crew had been bussed off to immigration. John found us after the kitchen had closed. Our waiter kindly brought him three bread rolls (plus some wine).

Cheryl with a heap of cans to label.

The rest of the time was effectively divided into two, tasks for the boat and sight-seeing. Regarding the first, George’s Godparents Keith and Fiona went along and helped with sail repairs and are now signed up for Seattle was well. I did a bit of flaking (see Post 57) but my main contribution this time was lending a hand with the victualling, as you can see throughout this Post. Having sorted the cans into fruit, vegetables, pulses, meat and fish, we discovered that pineapple is not for pudding but for sweet and sour dishes, so had to go back and re-allocate them in the day bags. Each bag has a bread mix and a cake mix.

Day bags laid out for each day’s food

I don’t think I’ve mentioned Angie, the Round-The-Worlder on Unicef who is the official Victualler, on the left of the photo above. Unfortunately she fell over in the shower on day 1 in Punta and broke her wrist. Despite this she insisted on supervising the victualling at Punta before flying home to New Zealand. She then flew into Cape Town to oversee it all again. The hope is that she will be able to rejoin the fleet in Fremantle. She has the whole exercise down to a fine art, as long as we listen to her!

Fiona, Cheryl and me waiting patiently

I had a trip to Robben Island while waiting for Qingdao to clear immigration, worth going to as it brings back how recently it all happened. The island was reached by a 30 minute ferry ride and with potentially shark-infested waters you can understand why it was impossible to escape. Back on the mainland in the afternoon, we spent the time with Qingdao crew before greeting Punta and Unicef. The breeze had built up by the time they arrived such that they took more than an hour to get to the jetty.

Anne, me and Fiona at the roof top of The Silo. Breezy!

In addition to John being late “to work” the first morning, his phone had reset itself to UTC so his alarm on the second day was two hours late. Luckily I woke up so he made it to the boat on time; another crew member was not so lucky and didn’t arrive until lunchtime.

How’s that for a bottle of Champagne?

George, John and I went on a wine trip with a Clipper alumnus and six other crew around Constantia. We visited five very different vineyards (Steenberg, Klein Constantia, Buitenverwachting, High Constantia and Constantia Glen) and voted the “Vin de Constance” from Klein Constantia the best, although the next vineyard we tried, Buitenverwachting, told us their’s had recently been voted the best. Having whetted our appetites and shown us the certificate as proof, they then told us that there was none available!

Nicky, George and John at Klein Constantia

George also went shark diving one day which he says he enjoyed. The pictures did not make it look appealing to me. OBB were also interviewed by BBC Radio Somerset, the second interview they’ve made (the first being in London before they left).

Chandelier at Steenberg. See the grape pips?

There were some stunning chandeliers in Cape Town, as well as the one above, which looks like slices of red and green grapes, the one below was in an artisanal shopping area called The Watershed, where John bought me two dresses (Geoff, a fellow Unicef circumnavigator, has been buying one at each port for Cheryl). You can see one in the photo above of me with Cheryl and Fiona and a glass of fizz.

The Watershed

Next time, I really do promise, the full results of the Race so far.

58. Leg 3, Race 4

Before I start to tell you about the next race, a little information on the rules. You can find them on the Clipper website under “The Race”. There are general rules that apply over the whole year, governed by international sailing rules in the main, then course-specific ones for each individual race. Of interest today are the penalties, either in the form of a time penalty or in penalty points. The time penalty will reflect where you are positioned in that race, penalty points appear in a separate column in the race viewer “overall race” section (on a computer, not on a phone). As yet no penalty points have appeared but we expect that to change very soon.

The fleet in harbour

If a boat is over the line when the start is signalled, they will have an hour added to their time, plus one minute for every second they are over the line. If they go around and recross the line the penalty will not apply but they’ll obviously lose time in doing this.

If they do not hand in the forms that are required before racing, at the appointed time, they will get two penalty points each for the three different forms that are required, so possibly six penalty points. Failure to hand the main ones in before starting to race will result in a disqualification for that race (no points awarded, wherever they come in the racing). For the others there are more penalty points as time passes with no forms appearing. Similar rules apply for the forms required at the end of the race, although instead of being disqualified they’ll get another two penalty points. Forgetting your paperwork could result in your having minus points for a race!

Cloud between Table Mountain and Signal Hill

Opposite to penalties is redress. If a boat has to divert to help another Clipper yacht or any other vessel, they may be granted compensation for time lost. This could result in a yacht being bumped up the results table, such that the first three over the line may not always be the three on the podium.

For any sail repairs by external companies costing more than £500 over the whole race there will be two penalty points for every extra £500. For example, you spend £250 in Race 1 having a sail repaired, then £300 in Race 2, you’ve exceeded that £500 limit. If Race 3 requires repairs costing more than £450 you’ll reach £1000 and get two penalty points. If a sail cannot be repaired and has to be replaced, a penalty of five to eight points will be allotted (depending on which stage of the race that this happens). This is why sail repairs by the crew are so important. As well as the repairs that happen in port, there will be people down in the sail locker carrying out repairs during the racing. Unicef are lucky in having Holly, a circumnavigator (and surgeon), as the sail repairer. Qingdao also have a circumnavigator, Bertrand, but have lost Jo, who only signed up for Legs 1 and 2 and was very experienced at repairs. The same rules apply to lost or damaged equipment. In the last Race (2017-18) I’m told there were only a couple of boats that did not exceed these costs.

Seattle and Bermuda

Course specific instructions will cover the exact position of the start and finish lines, the Scoring Gate and the Ocean Sprint. It will detail areas that cannot be entered, for example in Race 3, there was an exclusion zone of 3 nautical miles off parts of the coast around Cape Town, resulting in Punta del Este being knocked off the podium and leading to a Dawson One-Two of Qingdao and Unicef. I may have mentioned that already?

Unicef crew with their pennant

Enough technical stuff for today. Leg 3 consists of Race 4 only, from Cape Town in South Africa to Fremantle in Australia. Race 3 was described by many crew as “brutal”, constantly cold and wet. Race 4 is likely to be more of the same. Where Race 3 was around two weeks in length, Race 4 will be over three weeks. They leave Cape Town on Sunday 17th November and the arrival window is December 9th to 14th. I arrive very early on 9th so let’s hope I’m not kept waiting too long (nor that they are kept waiting for me).

As Cape Town was the end of a Leg, crew changes will be happening. For Qingdao, I think that four crew leave (two who did Legs 1 and 2, one who did Leg 2 only and one who will be returning on later legs). There will be an extra eight arriving, so overall Qingdao will gain four. For Unicef, five are leaving (three of whom did Leg 2 only, and two who will be rejoining the boat at a later leg). They are gaining seven, so an increase of two, although one of these did Leg 1 and is now returning for Leg 3. I know of other boats where people are leaving early, due either to illness or for personal reasons. I’m not aware of any getting off our two boats when they were expecting to continue.

Qingdao crew with their pennant

I had promised the Race 3 results in this post but as Crew Briefing takes place later today (Saturday) and any penalty points accrued to date should be announced then, I’ll keep this for the next post. The midday gun has just been fired, MBB are on their boats preparing for the race start tomorrow and I have other things to do. More later. Bye for now from your Cape Town correspondent.

Cape Town and Table \Mountain from the water

57. Race 3 Results

Here I am in sunny Cape Town ignoring the sun to bring you the news. It’s a hard life. Actually I think I’ll go get some sun and come back to you later….

The view from our room on a sunny day

Later, the next day. The sun isn’t so strong and there’s a wind so here I am again.

The view from our room on most days

Day 3, will this blog post ever be finished? I ended up helping with the sails yesterday, not the sewing this time but the folding (“flaking”) once they were ready to go back on board.

Sail packed up ready for the boat

If you’ve been following the Clipper website you’ll already know the results but here they are for those of you relying on me. I arrived very early on 7th November, the first day of the arrival window. As we know from the last race, boats may arrive before the window if racing hard, but I did ask Qingdao not to come in too early as I didn’t want to miss them. I was sitting at breakfast when I saw them in the distance. I didn’t want to get too excited after Portimao, but no-one else was in sight.

Qingdao in the distance

I finished my breakfast and went down to the docks to see them come in, FIRST, at six minutes past seven on Friday November 8th. (I was not eating a very early breakfast, once over the finish line they spend about an hour taking down the sails and tidying themselves and the boat up then have to motor into the dock). They had an amazing welcome with Isebane se Afrika performing for them. You can watch it here although it is rather blurred in places. https://www.facebook.com/ClipperRaceLIVE/videos/532013007361150/

Unicef in view

Next in was Punta del Este at 15.25 that afternoon, THIRD was Unicef at 17.02 and fourth Ha Long Bay at 18.00. As you can see from the times, a hard fought race for these positions. At one point on the breakwater we could see Ha Long Bay behind Unicef and it was very tense watching. You can see from the photo above how strong the wind was. They were tacking close up to us then way off into the distance to try and reach the finish line. We were able to distract ourselves with the black oystercatchers and George managed to get a good shot for me. I couldn’t hold the camera still enough, the wind was so blustery. If you go onto Facebook live again you’ll see a video of Unicef arriving, with John being interviewed. I can’t get the exact link for some reason but if you follow this you’ll know which video to click on! https://www.facebook.com/ClipperRaceLIVE/videos/

Black oystercatcher

On Saturday another five of the fleet came in. It is now Monday and we are waiting for the last two, Dare to Lead and Zhuhai, expected late tonight and very early in the morning. They will miss the prize giving ceremony tonight but I think they’d be too downhearted to celebrate with the others after taking so long to get in. The wind here can be very fickle and they can see Table Mountain long before reaching the shore.

Last night we heard that, due to infringement of the rules on how close to the coast they can sail, Punta del Este had a six-hour penalty imposed. If you go back to the times above, you will see that this meant they were actually placed fourth and Unicef promoted from third to second! Our first double Dawson podium one-two (first of many we hope, with Unicef allowed to beat Qingdao some of the time). It was extra special as two of George’s Godparents plus a very good friend from Somerset had joined us in Cape Town. Here are three of the groupies!

Me, Anne and Fiona

With the overall points known, but no penalty points yet announced (for damage to sails or other equipment, costing over £500 for the whole race), Qingdao are still in the lead with 48 points. Punta and Visit Sanya are joint second with 32 points each, Ha Long Bay fourth with 29 and Unicef move up from seventh to fifth with 23 points. I think Qingdao are the only boat to have a podium position in each race. We have been told that it’s consistency that will win the whole Race so let’s hope this continues.

Next up: a brief rundown of the rules and details of the next race, plus total results and scores.

56. Leg 2 Race 3

A few more photos of Punta del Este to break up the text before the next post, from Cape Town.

Casapueblo, passed on our bus trip

This is the first time crew members will have changed, some getting off at Punta del Este after Leg 1 and others getting on for Leg 2. Looking at the farewell photos on the Clipper website, https://www.clipperroundtheworld.com/news/view-gallery/the-fleet-departs-punta-del-este it would appear that there are 15 crew on Bermuda, 16 on Dare To Lead, 18 on Ha Long Bay, 19 each on Sanya, Unicef, Seattle, Zhuhai and Korea, 20 on Qingdao, 21 on Punta and 22 on WTC Logistics.

Much discussion goes on about weight, whether fewer crew means faster boats (not just the crew themselves but the food requirements as well), or whether fewer crew means more tired crew as they have to do more. I’m not sure, based on the results to date, that it has any meaningful impact.

A local bird that builds nests of mud

For Unicef I think there were four people off and five on. For Qingdao it was four off and three on. Josh, Skipper of Ha Long Bay, told me he had about eleven new people joining. I’m sure that could have a bigger impact on how well they do compared to the overall weight. Although Ha Long Bay, at the time of writing, are up near the front and Bermuda and Dare To Lead further back. It’s not an exact science. Do I hear you ask who’s at the front? Well, let’s hope it’s not a repeat of race 1 as Unicef and Qingdao are leading. Will the famous wind hole caused by Table Mountain be their undoing? I hope they’ve got evasive action planned this time, I’m not sure I could bear the stress of it happening again.

Another local bird

The race started from Punta del Este on Wednesday 23rd October and the arrival window into Cape Town is two and a half weeks later, Thursday 7th to Monday 11th November. I’ve taken a bit of a gamble and am arriving on the morning of 7th so I hope Qingdao don’t repeat themselves and arrive early. It’s not looking likely, current ETAs (1400 UTC 5th November) are from Saturday morning to Monday morning.

The famous “La Mano” sculpture by Chilean artist Mario Irarrázabal

The results for the Scoring Gate are in Post 55 so I won’t repeat them. Before the Ocean Sprint, Seattle went into Stealth Mode, although it didn’t gain them any places. Imagine Your Korea went into Stealth Mode during the Ocean Sprint and came out in fourth place. As I can’t remember where they were before I don’t know if they’ve improved their position. Unicef and Punta both in Stealth on Tuesday night / Wednesday.

Accordionist at the prize giving

Qingdao have been constantly in Stealth Mode due to the fact that their tracker is playing up, so we’re never sure where they are at any given moment. You can play with the “ruler tool” if you’re looking at Race Viewer on a computer (not on a phone, I don’t know about tablets, in my world they are things you swallow to make you feel better). This will help you guesstimate where the boats are and is fun (well, what passes for fun to me, sad I know).

The “catamaran” from which we saw the fleet leave

I have not spent all my time on the Clipper website and Race Viewer, but one last mention of the Unicef skipper’s report today, read it and shiver! https://www.clipperroundtheworld.com/skipper-report/unicef/race3-day14-team48

Part of the packing

I have ended up with two incredibly heavy cases this time, as not only do I have John’s warm fleecy sleeping bag layer but also a sleeping bag from Sophie, another Unicef crew member, who got off at Punta and is getting back on at Cape Town after doing a safari. And also 23 (I think) Qingdao tee shirts for someone so we can save postage! Then there’s the usual bits and pieces for both John and George, John’s “civilian” clothes and somewhere in all this, my stuff. I started to pack on Monday, I thought I’d finished early on Wednesday then realised yet again I’d not got my bathroom cosmetics and toiletries. They are usually what I forget until the last minute, and of course they can’t go in hand luggage. I’m glad I’ve not got contact lenses any more, the stuff for them took up far too much room.

By the time you read this I’ll be on my way, probably sitting at Heathrow waiting for the flight to take off. I’ve checked Race Viewer, read all the Skipper Reports, tidied the flat, checked Race Viewer, read all the Facebook and WhatsApp messages, had an odd meal of all the food that won’t keep during my absence, checked Race Viewer, sorted out what I’m planning to do for Seattle in APRIL and so on. Now to check that I’ve not forgotten anything vital (phone charged? Rands? Passport?) and head off. Not in the vehicle below, it didn’t look like it had moved for ages, judging by the tyres.

Garzon truck outside PdE Yacht Club

Next time, greetings from Cape Town and possibly race 3 results!